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TINY Federal Tabletop Cupboard with Original Paint History.....SOLD

Eastern United States, New England or possibly Mid-Atlantic, ca. 1800. Pine. Early dark cerulean-blue paint over robins egg blue over salmon, the paint layers demonstrating that it was frequently used, prized, and updated as paint wore. The form is unusual with a carved door, of nine panels, over a lipped drawer. Despite the thin pine-stock, hand-plane marks are quite evident. At UNDER 10 inches tall, this little cupboard likely was intended for use on a tabletop, chest, shelf, or desk. The interior shelf is beautifully shaped, suggesting that it displayed something of importance that was meant to be seen. Ink stains within the drawer indicate that it may have also held writing material. Nailed joinery includes small roseheads on the drawer. Intriguingly, the drawer-front's backside is carved into a semi-round, the drawer bottom similarly carved to receive this shape. The delicate structure, consistent with Federal design, has survived with just small losses, particularly to the drawer's corner molding, while retaining the original hinges, brass pulls, and tiny turnbuckle. Wear to paint as shown. About 9.5 inches tall x 5 3/4 wide x 5 1/2 deep. Provenance includes long ago Robert Thayer.

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Colonial Fingered Box in Scarce BLUE Paint.....SALE PENDING

New England, ca 1780-1800. Pine top and bottom, ash or chestnut sidewall. More heavily constructed than similar boxes of later make. Fingered bands joined by rosehead nails. The blue paint, scarce in this period, was possibly made from pigment extracted from the leaves/blossoms of the indigo plant. Complex dry, gravelly patinated surface outside; dark patina inside which is a clue to how it might have been used. In hand, robust, and with a different "feel" than later boxes. Excellent condition; inconsequential ancient loss at top left edge as shown. Smooth burnishing from frequent handling at edges. Substantial size at about 9 1/8 inches long x 7 wide x 3 1/8 tall. I don't recall having a box of this form that was this early let alone in striking original blue paint.

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Fine Burl "Ram's Horn" or "Fiddle-Scrolled" Ladle.....SOLD

Northeast America, ca. late 18th century. Carved from highly figured ash burl in richly colored unvarnished surface. The handle terminates in a scroll that stands proud in the form of a ram's horns, a shape seen in the period fireplace equipment like peels. Note how the outer edge of the termination is in-carved into a "channel". A strong example of a utilitarian object made to be beautiful. Length about 8 1/2 inches, the bowl about 5 wide. Provenance: Private collection for 25 years.

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GRAPHIC EARLY AMERICAN FOLK ART SHIRRED RUG WITH SCARCE DEEP-BLUE GROUND.....SOLD

New England, ca. 1840-1850. The maker expressed her feelings of optimism and abundance through this captivating shirred rug. It is true folk art, from the creativity and the vision of the gifted artist, not from a pattern. Shirred rugs, popular from the 1820s to the 1850s, were made mostly from accumulated fabric scraps tightly packed together and stitched onto homespun backing. The vivid polychrome flower, in full bloom, with upward radiating opening buds and perimeter vining, fills the composition with life and energy as if it is trying to burst beyond the confines of its borders. Shades of red, yellow, green, blue, and sage color-contrast beautifully against the rare intense indigo-blue variegated ground. This rug has an impressive color and scale that can be the focus of a room. Professionally mounted for hanging. About 50 inches wide x 36 tall. Provenance: Private collection; important rug collection of Ronnie Newman. See Kopp, "American Hooked and Sewn Rugs, Folk Art Underfoot" for reference.

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Paint Decorated American Patriot Militia Canteen Dated 1775.....SALE PENDING

New England, likely New Hampshire or Massachusetts. "Cheese box" form in original paint on what appears to be ash or chestnut sidewall and pine top and bottom. Circa 1775-1810, yet given the form likely closer to that latter part of that date range, which would suggest that the 1775 date is commemorative. Based on oral history, this canteen was owned by Amos Barnes (1754-1840) of South Acton, MA, and N.H., who was a veteran of both the American Revolution and the War of 1812. Amos enlisted and marched to Boston in 1775 where he participated in the Battle of Bunker Hill, later Trenton (led by George Washington) in 1776, and also Monmouth. He re-enlisted in 1778, serving again with Washington at Valley Forge. The 1775 date was painted in green over white which contrasts against the blue ground and white decoration. Retains a later wide loomed strap, likely added around the War of 1812, attached to remnants of the first narrow strap. Pencil inscription reads: "Davis Blues / Grandpa Barnes". About 6 ¾ inches diameter by 2 7/8 deep. Stand was made custom to display this piece. More background information on Amos Barnes available. Provenance: Until recently in a private New England collection for about 30 years.

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7-COLOR Country Parcheesi Gameboard.....SOLD

Eastern America, 19th century. Original polychrome paint on wooden panel. Deriving movement from the primary design element of pinwheels and puncuated by blue dots, this game board has strong color-contrast that impacts from across the room. The maker worked green, red, blue, and yellow pigments against a cream background and white round reserves, borders delineated in black lining. Condition is very good with no cracks. Wear from playing and buildup of patina, and a few scattered small paint splatters. About 18 inches square x 5/8 thick. Acquired in 2001 at the Heart of Country Show in Nashville.

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A LITTLE MASTERWORK(!!!) PORTRAIT OF A BABY BOY WITH RIDING CROP

New England, ca. 1845. One of the finest Prior-school portraits of this type known. Attributed to William Mathew Prior . Oil on board. The inviting warm color palette complemented by the striking, unique, paint decorated frame. The shape of the lips and eyes, and softness of the face are exceptional. The child centering colorful draped swags with rim lighting. Note red corals at each sleeve of the delicate, lace-trimmed dress, the coral typically worn by children as it was believed to ward off evil. He grasps a riding crop, a device sometimes held in portraits as they were a common gift for boys in this period. Even though way too young to ride a living horse or pony, he could saddle-up with his crop on his rocking horse. The paint decorated frame is a treasure on its own, yet combined with the portrait creates a singular presence. Overall frame size about 18 inches x 13 3/4. Exceptional condition. Provenance: Distinguished private collection for decades. A rare opportunity to acquire an iconic folk art image.

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The BLUE MELONS and Grapes. AMERICAN FOLK ART THEOREM.....SOLD

Eastern US, ca. 1840. Watercolor on wove paper. Only a small group of blue-dominant melon theorems are known. The blue melons, each segment skillfully contrasted by green, center clusters of plump grapes, all resting on a blue-feather edged platter. Coveted folk art flatness without shadowing. The transitions between colors, areas of brightness and darkness, and fine stippling, are masterful. The seeds, subtely bordered in red, give movement as they radiate from the center as do the striations between melon segments. In a period gilt frame of about 26 1/4 inches wide x 19 1/4 tall. Excellent condition with colors remaining fresh and vibrant. Remarkable provenance includes the pioneering folk art collector Dotty Kauffaman, Barry Cohen, Edgar William and Bernice Chrysler Garbisch; and private CT folk art collection since 1979....A very similar painting, perhaps by the same hand, is in the collection of the Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Folk Art Center at Colonial Williamsburg. Described in Treasures of American Folk Art from the AARFAC as: "The simplicity of its design, combined with the linear quality of the upright melon slices and the encircling grape clusters, makes the small painting one of the most visually pleasing watercolors in the Center's collection".

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Classic Colonial Ash Burl Bowl of Small Size.....SALE PENDING

Northeast America, ca. 1800. In original dry surface. Robustly made, very solidly turned yet with sophisticated footed design with subtle beehive turnings. Feels good in hand. Just 6 inches diameter x 2 1/2 tall. A first rate example. Excellent condition.

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Shaker Three-Finger Box in Blue.....SALE PENDING

New England, ca. 1840. Maple walled with pine top and bottom. Original dry blue paint, a difficult color to acquire. Three-fingers face left, a much less common orientation than right-facing. Structurally excellent condition. Inside appears that at one time it held berries. Smaller size at about 6 inches long x 4 3/8 wide x 2 3/8 tall. A really good one for stacking. Very recently from a Rockland, Maine, collection..

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