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Iconic American Colonial Tavern Tankard . Impressive Size. Remarkable Condition. Noteworthy Provenance.....SALE PENDING

New England, ca. 1750-1780. Cooper-made with pine staves, lid, and base, and what appears to be ash interlocking bands. UNTOUCHED original condition with completely dry surface and natural patina. Clever construction without the use of nails, the handle being part of a narrow stave that is secured tightly in-place by beautifully crafted interlocking bands that were shrunk into position. The severely sloping and tapering lid (the deep angle consistent with the very early date) is joined to the handle by a wooden pin. The enormous scale (about 11 inches tall x 8 diameter at the base) indicates use in a tavern as a sharing vessel rather than for individual drinking. The sidewalls are steeply sloped. The elegance and sophistication of the design combined with the superior craftsmanship are hallmarks of early period work. The condition can be best described as AWESOME! Reference: "Illustrated Encyclopedia of the American Revolution" by George Neumann and Frank Kravic. Provenance: Gifted in the 1950s by Nina Fletcher Little to her close friend Alice Andrews of Winchester, Massachusetts. A SUPERIOR EXAMPLE. Happy to email high res photos.

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Vibrant True Folk Art Theorem

New England, ca. 1830. Paint on velvet. A "one-in-a-thousand" example with a composition from the mind of the artist retaining remarkably bold, bright, primary colors and accomplished gradation of paint. Set within a simple reductive lemon-yellow basket with green borders. Lights up even a darker space. For the collector seeking the exceptional. Overall frame size about 17 1/2 inches wide x 14 tall. Provenance includes Steward Gregory; Claude and Alvan Bisnoff.

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Schoolbook Watercolor of Repeating Blue Eagles.....SALE PENDING

Likely New Hampshire, ca. 1815. Watercolor and wash on paper. A singular representation of admiration and patriotism for the artist's young country, painted in the Federal period, the imagery of repeating blue and gold eagles within circular reserves. Originally found in New Hampshire. In a period red-painted frame of about 10 3/4 inches x 8 3/4 (watercolor size about 8 x 6). Provenance: Paul McInnis (Hampton Falls, NH); Stephen Score; David Schorsch; Barbara Pollack; the important Americana collection of Daphne Farago; and an important Midwest collection. Exhibited Rhode Island School of Design, 1985, and pictured in the exhibition catalogue "Americana from the Daphne Farago Collection". Also pictured in Sotheby's, American Folk Art and Furniture formerly in the Collection of Daphne Farago, sold for the Benefit of the Rhode Island School of Design, February 2, 1991.

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Full Length Profile Portrait of 4-Year Old John Smith and his Wheelbarrow. JH Davis.....SOLD

New England. Likely Maine or New Hampshire. Dated 1837. Confidently attributed to Joseph H. Davis, active 1832-1837. Of exceptional appeal and character. Watercolor, pencil, and probably gum arabic (to provide detail to the black clothing) on woven paper. The inclusion of the wheelbarrow is charming and is probably unique to surviving Davis' works. John wears a black coat with brass buttons over trousers, with frilly collar. Note the tiny feet. Inscription across the base reads: "John H. Smith. Aged 4 Feb 12th, 1838. Painted December 1837". Excellent condition with expected paper toning. Overall frame size about 7 ¾ inches x 6 3/8. Provenance: Prominent Midwestern Collection.

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OUTSTANDING Portrait of a Handsome Teen/Young Man.... Prior

New England, ca. 1835-1845. Oil on pressed board. Attributed to William Mathew Prior (1806-1873). Prior rendered a fun and outgoing likeness of a most confident, pleasant and fashionable sparkly blue-eyed teen/young man with straight hair ending in curls, his black coat and cravat revealing a fine yellow-patterned vest. The painting is bright and clear and appears to be in all original condition retaining its first over-varnish. No appearance of in-painting. Unobtrusive typical minor waviness to the board. Overall frame size about 19 inches tall x 14 1/2 wide; site size about 13 1/2 x 9 1/2. The period frame with cornerblocks is special and presents the painting exceptionally well. The frame bears the label of Montfort Coolidge (1888-1954) of Ogunquit, Maine, a famous artist and antiques dealer. See Artist and Visionary, William Mathew Prior Revealed, Fennimore Art Museum, for reference. A sensational example of Prior's work.

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A LITTLE MASTERWORK(!!!) PORTRAIT OF A BABY BOY WITH RIDING CROP

New England, ca. 1845. One of the finest Prior-school portraits of this type known. Attributed to William Mathew Prior . Oil on board. The inviting warm color palette complemented by the striking, unique, paint decorated frame. The shape of the lips and eyes, and softness of the face are exceptional. The child centering colorful draped swags with rim lighting. Note red corals at each sleeve of the delicate, lace-trimmed dress, the coral typically worn by children as it was believed to ward off evil. He grasps a riding crop, a device sometimes held in portraits as they were a common gift for boys in this period. Even though way too young to ride a living horse or pony, he could saddle-up with his crop on his rocking horse. The paint decorated frame is a treasure on its own, yet combined with the portrait creates a singular presence. Overall frame size about 18 inches x 13 3/4. Exceptional condition. Provenance: Distinguished private collection for decades. A rare opportunity to acquire an iconic folk art image.

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Important Coffin Family of Nantucket Candle Lantern.....SALE PENDING

Nantucket, ca. 1750. Unusual construction likely influenced by needs aboard whaling vessels. Pine with natural surface and sensational occluded wavy glass. In addition to the rare "diamond" window form, this lantern is further elevated by BOLD DOVETAILS, and a door that opens from the back. Dovetails are tightened by reinforcing ROSE HEAD NAILS, while the glass is held by tiny forged brads. The door retains its original snipe hinges and tin latch. The top retains the original tinned-iron vent. Condition is very good with several character-adding period repairs including an early wire closure of a crack on the door, and a tin sheet across the inner top of the door held by early nails. The hanging hole in the backboard is more typical of that seen on wallboxes, not lanterns, indicating a wall mount. About 14 inches tall x 5 3/4 wide x 5 1/2 deep. Until recently, this lantern had not left the prominent Coffin family of Nantucket. The Coffins were a group of whalers operating out of Nantucket from the 17th to 19th centuries. Tristram Coffin (ca. 1609-1681) came to Massachusetts from England. In 1659 he led a group of investors that bought Nantucket from Thomas Mayhew for thirty pounds and two beaver hats. He became a prominent citizen of the settlement. A great number of his descendants also became prominent citizens, and many were involved in the later history of Nantucket during and after its heyday as a whaling center. Almost all notable Americans with roots in Nantucket are descended from Tristram Coffin.

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Carved and Painted Shore Bird......SOLD

Northeast America, ca. 19th century. Terrific character. Appears to be pine body and ash or chestnut bill in original taupe-colored paint. Extensive tool marks readily apparent. The impressive 5-inch long beak extends via a tenon through the head and out the back where it is wedged in place. Mounted in museum stand. Overall length of about 14 3/4 inches, height in stand to the top of the head about 11 inches. Provenance: Private folk art and antique collection; Colette Donovan. .

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"Hot Soda" Sign Board

American, ca. 1860-1890. Original polychrome paint on pine.....19th-century consumers were enthralled by the supposed healing properties of fizzy water. Grand devices were invented which made brewing and serving fizzy drinks easy. This trade-sign proudly declared that the vendor had fizzy water in the form of hot soda....the bright yellow ground color and bold black lettering with gold shadowing was intentionally obtrusive to attract customers from a distance......Angled corners with molding applied by cut nails. Signed by the maker/artist "Emery". Terrific crackled surface. An unusually energizing sign both in visual impact and in subject. About 72 inches long x 13 tall.

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Scarce Early Trade Sign

New England, ca. 1800-1820. Love this! Mustard and black paint on pine. Pit-sawn back with picture frame molding attached by cut nails. Note the 'long S' in Dress-maker that transitioned to the "S" as we know it after ca. 1800. The comma after the name, and the period at the end of dressmaker are also early conventions. Note how BEAUTIFULLY formed and flowing the lettering was rendered, indicating a very skilled sign painter. Exceptional paint condition with expected craquelure. Structurally sound with inconsequential losses at lower left of the molding resulting from the nailing on of the original cut nails. Small size has flexibilty to be put most anywhere: About 32 inches wide x 13 1/2 tall by 2 at the molding. My other two signs of this form were from NH, this may be as well. Simple. Elegant. Soul-full.

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